I Started Getting Botox at 30

When my neurologist told me that I was a candidate for Botox, I was very much against it. At the time, I was only in my late twenties, and I look about 18 or so. Why would I want to do Botox?

Sheesh, was I ever naive.

Eventually, when I was still getting a lot of migraines and headache days, even after noticing a difference with my vitamin therapy and acupuncture. So, I said, “Sure, why not?” I called my insurance, got some information, and made my first appointment.

The day came and I was nervous. It is not as though I don’t like shots (I can take them or leave them, honestly, and I do get acupuncture regularly), but I am not a fan of the unknown factor of it. Some shots hurt, others burn, and others cause a lingering pain that only gets worse over the next few days (helloooo, flu shot!). Here I was, injecting a ruddy β˜› toxin ☚ into my head, neck, and shoulders!

☠️ Toxin [tok-sin] n. any poison produced by an organism, characterized by antigenicity in certain animals and high molecular weight, and including the bacterial toxins that are the causative agents of tetanus, diphtheria, etc., and such plant and animal toxins as ricin and snake venom. ☠️

And I was doing this willingly and knowingly?

What was wrong with me?!

Was I crazy?!?

No.

I was desperate.

You see, a sufferer of Chronic Migraine does not qualify for Botox treatment unless they have tried and failed three different preventative treatments.

I was at FIVE.

The office nurse takes me into the usual exam room, with its big wooden desk, low black shelves filled with magazines, brochures, and information about anything and everything neurological and decorated with little potted plants. I sat in my usual chair, and she took my blood pressure and temperature, as usual. I was starting to feel more at ease, everything was going as usual, and the normalcy was calming. I signed the release forms, read through the papers she gave me with the rules. Things like, “No strenuous exercise,” “No massage,” etc. Essentially, let the poison sink in. πŸ™„

The neuro comes in and we chat, I update her on my attacks, she goes over all of the papers I was given with me, we shoot the breeze. I lie down on the exam table and she does the first few shots into my forehead. Okay. I’ve had mosquito bites hurt more. I turn my head and get more around each of my ears. I won’t lie, that hurt. There is no muscle to cushion the shots, just scalp and skull. Ouch I move to a chair, and I got them at the nape of my neck, down each side of my neck, and each shoulder. No big deal.

With that, I was done and sent on my way. Man, did my head feel weird. Not being able to move my eyebrows was the strangest sensation I have ever experienced!

Over the next few hours, the tension started. I was warned about this. You inject the Botox into certain areas, the rest of the muscles think they have to pick up the slack. If it got too unbearable, I was told to take some naproxen or ibuprofen to take care of it.

This repeated every three months from then on out. I have only had one negative experience where I had a rare side effect. I get most of my migraines on the right side, so my current neuro put a little extra on that side (common practice), but it messed with the muscles that support my eye, and I had trouble focusing on things for about three weeks until things settled. I have overlapping vision already because the prescription for my astigmatism is odd and between levels. Since the muscles were weak from the Botox, my eye couldn’t hold position long enough to get proper focus.

However, it did get better! He doesn’t put extra near my eyes, anymore. I still go every three months. It sucks when the appointments get delayed, though, because if you go too long, it is like starting over, when you have to wait three treatments before seeing the results again.

A perk (aside from the obvious effect it can have on migraines) is that you won’t sweat as much in the areas you get the shots! Believe it or not, but Botox is often used to treat excessive sweating! A whole host of other things, too! It is not just a cosmetic procedure, anymore!

So, yeah, if your neurologist recommends Botox to you, give it a try! Most insurances cover it, and there are discount programs, so don’t be afraid of it! The worst thing that will happen is that you try it for three treatments (nine months), don’t see results, and stop. In that case, you are no worse off than when you started!

At least you tried, right?

(I almost said, “At least you gave it a shot,” but I refrained. You’re welcome!)

πŸ’–Hearts and Sparkles!πŸ’–
~Bunny~

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